The Future of Work

The event will be held in Trinity House, Trinity Square, Tower Hill, London EC3N 4DH on 13 November 2012

The world of work has been described as VUCA – volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. One of the core aspects of the 21st Century is the notion of risk and complexity. In the past century, wealth implied material abundance, though in the current one it will increasingly imply the ability to mitigate risk.

Who is it for?

This broad-ranging theme will be widely interesting but will have particular relevance to those who have a policy-making role – and are able to take the themes identified and help shape their own contents. It will also help senior HR professionals in their forward thinking about roles, structures, skills and locations.

Overview

The world of work has been described as VUCA – volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. One of the core aspects of the 21st Century is the notion of risk and complexity. In the past century, wealth implied material abundance, though in the current one it will increasingly imply the ability to mitigate risk.

Large-scale global risks, such as the effects of both global warming and the legislation to counter it, the shift in relative power from West to East, or the ageing population in Western countries – all represent mega-trends shaping the future of work.

This workshop will build on previous work undertaken by CRF to draw out some of the main themes and likely responses. We will embrace technology but also draw on issues associated with resources, politics, economies and geography.

Content

At CRF’s Rome Conference in 2011, Carsten Sørensen framed the future of work as being fundamentally contradictory and necessitating a different approach to resolve contradictions. This year, combining delegates’ own insights and extensive academic research, Dr Sørensen will build on the idea of organisational paradoxes, setting up the challenges and offering some recommendations.

Among the organisational paradoxes that will be examined are:

• exploration of new opportunities vs exploitation of existing capabilities
• the technologising of work vs humanisation of technology
• hyper-connectivity vs nearness and intimacy
• anytime/anywhere vs sometime/somewhere
• mobile working vs fixed stability
• flexible vs fixed boundaries
• decentralised vs centralised innovation
• increased specialisation vs ‘new renaissance’ workers
• individualised services vs mistrust in increased surveillance
• amateurisation of professions vs increased professionalisation.

  • Tags
  • People Strategy