Summer Lecture and Drinks Reception

The event will be held in Haberdasher's Hall, 18 West Smithfield, London EC1A 9HQ on 4 July 2013

Held in one of London’s oldest livery company halls, our summer reception and lecture will be an occasion to meet socially in an informal environment conducive to member networking and the opportunity of meeting CRF partners.
The social nature of the event will be complemented by an address from our guest speaker, leading psychiatrist and writer, Iain McGilchrist.

Who is it for?

Members who are interested in the role neuroscience can play in people development, and those who wish to develop their professional network at a more informal event.

Overview

Held in one of London’s oldest livery company halls, our summer reception and lecture will be an occasion to meet socially in an informal environment conducive to member networking and the opportunity of meeting CRF partners.

The social nature of the event will be complemented by an address from our guest speaker, leading psychiatrist and writer, Iain McGilchrist.

Exploring the theme “How Your Brain has Duped You (and continues to do so)”, Iain will debunk some popular myths about how the brain works, and go beyond many of the simplistic notions that have historically tended to underpin the design of development activities.

Up to three attendees from each member organisation may participate in the lecture and reception.

Content

We are constantly amazed that things don’t work out the way the theory dictated. We are taken aback when our plans lead to stunted growth rather than excellence. We engineer an apparently fair, apparently safe society and are hurt when people don’t thank us. The best things seem to happen by chance. Science tells us we are mechanisms, but all the evidence points the other way. How did we get into this mess? The divided brain gives us a clue. This has nothing whatever to do with reason versus emotion. It has to do with two types of thinking. And at present one type, the type that is less intelligent, is telling you not to engage with the other. But if you want to understand the world you must.